What are ADHESIONS? A Quick Definition.

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What are adhesions?

When the load placed on the body is greater than the capacity of the body’s tissues to handle that load, the result is dysfunction.  Any time a muscle is overworked (repetitive motions, repeated contractions) or acutely injured (fall or collision causing a tear or crush), it receives a decreased amount of bloodflow (read: oxygen flow).  If this condition continues, the hypoxia (lack or oxygen flow) causes adhesions to form in the muscles.  These are sticky areas, almost as if someone poured glue into the muscle, which limit range of motion, alter your biomechanics, and cause pain.  Adhesions remain until they are treated.  Rest, ice, stretching, and ibuprofen will not make them go away!  You may get some temporary relief, but once you resume your activities, the issue will make itself known once again.  Active Release Techniques is a manual therapy technique that is effective in reducing the adhesions so that you can get back to your activities!

 

Photo:By User:Stannered (Image:Question mark alternate.png) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

 

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  1. […] relative to the one above or before it.  But what’s harder to understand is that once adhesions come into the picture, any two vertebrae that make up one joint can get “glued […]

  2. […] (read: oxygen flow).  If this condition continues, the hypoxia (lack or oxygen flow) causes adhesions to form in the muscles.  These are sticky areas, almost as if someone poured glue into the muscle, […]

  3. […] You may have heard of the piriformis muscle (and piriformis syndrome), but did you know that it’s only one of the six small muscles that perform essentially the same movement?  The six deep external rotator muscles of your hip are the piriformis, superior gemellus, inferior gemellus, obturator internus, obturator externus, and quadratus femoris.  They all allow you to move your leg back and out, and to rotate your leg outward.  When they are functioning properly, they don’t make the headlines.  But when they become aggravated through overuse or injury, they can press on the sciatic nerve (or worse, become “glued” to the nerve thanks to adhesions.) […]

  4. […] the body part so that the muscle is lengthened.  The Active Release Techniques protocols reduce adhesion in the muscles and other tissues, resulting in less pain and better function.  If you’ve had […]

  5. […] (read: oxygen flow).  If this condition continues, the hypoxia (lack or oxygen flow) causes adhesions to form in the muscles.  These are sticky areas, almost as if someone poured glue into the […]

  6. […] and if the injury has been going on for awhile, those structures have become littered with adhesions.  Deep tissue massage can help restore circulation and decrease inflammation to the elbow area. […]

  7. […] joint. 2.  Weakness of a muscle that affects joint biomechanics. 3.  Soft tissue restrictions (adhesions) in muscles that move a joint. 4.  Misalignment of pelvis or spinal […]